Song Painting Initial Printing Tests

Alright, so I know I’m a bit behind on my updates for this past semester.

Here is some copy pasta from my Generative Art specific blog, documenting my test prints/algorithm adjustments for my generative art final.

First, I set up some test prints. I had heard from Catherine that the printer in the print lab tends to print a bit darker.

I set up a photoshop layer with different layers. Each image had a varying brightness level adjusted by the amount indicated to the right.

brightnessTest01

Here is a scan of the printed result:

brightnessTestScan

I know that the scan has probably lost some of the actual color information, but the prints were noticeably darker than the digital version. I continued to use this as a key for future prints.

My first print: I printed “Sharp Dressed Man” at full resolution, with in retrospect was rather small (18×10 inches at 300 pixels/inch).

Feedback I received was to print at a larger scale, and research various ways to accomplish this in Processing.

So here is some information I found at saving high resolution images from Processing:

PDF Export: “The PDF library makes it possible to write PDF files directly from Processing. These vector graphics files can be scaled to any size and output at very high resolutions.”

PGraphics (#16 on 25 Life Saving Tips for Processing by Amnon): “…create[s] a high resolution copy of the regular draw() loop.”

I ended up sticking with the PDF Export, that way I could scale the image to whatever resolution I needed for printing. But the PGraphics “hack” does seem like a good alternative once I settle on the exact resolution I want for my prints.

I ended up making my print as big as the Print Lab in our department allowed me (which was approximately around 43×24 in).

The print did result in some valid feedback from my review in class.

Unfortunately, I currently do not have a great camera, so I cannot take a decent picture of the actual print.

But here is a snippet of my print that shows a good indication of the problem.

sdm_closeup01

Although the individual lines are actually quite crisp, due to the quantity and transparency of the strokes, the resulting printed image looks blurry when viewed at a closer distance.

Phil gave very good advice that a print should work at three distances: across the room, a few feet away, and up close. He said that I accomplished the first two, now just have to find a way to reward the viewer when they view my piece at a super close distance.

So I got some feedback to try overlaying a smaller line over the stroke to perhaps regain a sense of depth in the print, and add more visual interest at a closer viewing point.

Here are some tests:

I printed one line (strokeWidth = 4) and a second line (strokeWidth = 1) both at an alpha level equal to half of my original, this way the middle line would result in the full original alpha value.

sharpdressedman_pi00

 

I printed one line (strokeWidth = 4) and a second line (strokeWidth = 1) both at an alpha level equal to my original, this way the middle line would result in twice the full original alpha value.

sdm_closeup02

 

Yay! This actually made a huge difference! The sound waves were much better defined. I decided to print this version of my line strokes in a full print to get more feedback.

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